Pannier Bags

Pannier Bags - UNAVAILABLE
Pannier Bags - UNAVAILABLE
Item# GSP-PB100
$239.99
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Availability: Usually ships the next business day
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Pannier Bags

  • Cordura Pack Panniers
  • Made in the USA
  • Size:28" x 16" x 12"
  • 1000 denier nylon
  • Double stitched and reinforced with heavyweight 2" nylon webbing
  • Fitted corners and buckle down flaps
  • Metal rod in back to prevent sagging

    Pannier Bags

    Both the mule and the horse were used in packing because they each had different packing abilities. Mules can carry more weight, work longer hours, need less feed and can maneuvere more easily around narrow rocky areas on the trails. Horses, on the other hand, can travel through mud and swamps a lot easier than mules since their feet are broader. A packer had to take special care when packing the animals with horse packing gear and Pannier Bags and make sure that goods that could get spoiled if immersed in water were packed on the mules and not on the horses. In hot weather, a horse will lie down in a creek to cool itself off and could damage the goods it was carrying. On a routine day, the packers were usually awake by 3:00 or 4:00 in the morning to get their animals packed before the flies and bugs came out and made them hard to pack. The men worked in pairs placing the packs on the mule and horse Pack Saddles. It was very important to load the pack animals properly because a shifty pack saddle could injure the animal's back or, even worse, send them tumbling off a cliff to their death. Once the packs were in place, the famous "diamond hitch" was thrown over the packs. When everything was ready, a bell was rung and the train was off, with an experienced horse or mule in the lead. Also check out our certified Bear Proof Panniers for use in "Bear Country". This lead animal wore a bell and all the others knew to follow. Usually, for every ten pack animals, there was one packer riding horseback. The foreman rode up and down the train, making sure all was well. When the lead horse came to a difficult place in the trail or a stream crossing, the boss would ride up to supervise. As a rule, the cook rode on ahead of the train. He would have camp set up and a hot meal ready when the train arrived. These stops were usually at grassy feeding places along the trail. The animals became so familiar with the trails and the stopping places that they would become impatient as they approached the camp. When the pack train arrived at the campsite, the horses and mules would file up in a great half-circle around the lead horse. The packs were taken off and placed beside the harness of each animal. The animals were then turned free to graze around the camp with mule and Horse Hobbles on. By this time, the cook and his helper had made a roaring fire and supper was on. The packers were finally able to retire for a well-earned rest.

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